Pediatric Associates News

OSU Meningococcal Update - 03/13/2017

March 14, 2017

Meningococcal Update - 03/13/2017 

To all OSU faculty and staff,

We are writing to inform you that more than 1,800 students were vaccinated last week against type B meningococcal disease at clinics held on the Oregon State University Corvallis campus. The mass vaccinations were necessary due to three cases of type B meningococcal disease involving OSU students within the past four months. Additionally, OSU Student Health Services already had administered about 650 vaccinations since last fall in addition to many more by local pharmacies and private physicians.

We continue to encourage vaccinations for students considered at highest risk for this disease. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, those at highest risk include students age 25 and younger who live in on-campus housing or are members of - or visit - fraternal living groups associated with the university.

Faculty and staff members are not considered to be within this risk group. Faculty and staff who are concerned about exposure to meningitis, or are interested in being vaccinated for meningococcal B disease, are encouraged to contact their primary care physician.

Students can still receive the vaccines at Student Health Services in Plageman Hall on campus, 108 S.W. Memorial Place, or call 541-737-9355. For those not yet vaccinated, the upcoming spring break provides an opportunity to visit personal medical providers for students who may be traveling home. 

At last week’s clinics, all students who received the vaccination were given wallet cards with vaccination details, such as the brand and potential side effects; and advised about follow-up steps that include clinics in mid- to late-April for the second dose required to ensure full effectiveness.

Health officials have recommended that all students be aware of the symptoms of this potentially fatal infection, which can include high fever, stiff neck, rash, headaches, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Anyone who exhibits these symptoms should immediately visit Student Health Services, which is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. For after-hour resources, immediately go to a nearby urgent care medical clinic or hospital emergency room.

While meningococcal disease is not highly contagious, it is transmitted through direct contact with droplets from coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or through intimate personal contact.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at 541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

 


OSU Meningococcal Update 03/02/2017

*****The date is incorrect in the link title but the info is dated 03/02/2017

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/about-shs/health-alerts/meningococcal-update-03-12-17

 


Winter Break and meningococcal vaccinations - 12/12/2016

If you plan to get vaccinated for Meningococcal disease (type B) while home on winter break, please pay attention to the brand of vaccine you are given:

>> Bexsero® requires two doses, the second dose given one month following
the first

>> Trumenba® requires three doses, the second given 30-60 days after the initial dose, and the third dose given at 6 months.

These vaccines cannot be intermixed. Student Health Services can provide follow up doses of either Bexsero® or Trumenba® once you have returned to Oregon State University.

If you have already received a first dose of Meningococcal B vaccine at SHS, or in Corvallis, you will want to follow up with the second or subsequent dose while home on break. It is important you let your health care provider know which brand of vaccine you started.

Student Health Services is currently using Bexsero. Providers in the community are using either Bexsero or Trumemba. Call Student Health Services if you do not remember the brand or the date you received your first dose.


Health Alert - New 11/18/16

Nov. 18, 2016
Meningococcal vaccinations to be offered

Oregon State University and the Benton County Health Department continued Friday to identify and treat with preventive antibiotics OSU students who may have come into close contact with a second student diagnosed this week with meningococcal disease.

“It is important that students who have had close contact receive antibiotic treatment as soon as possible,” said Paul Cieslak, medical director for the communicable disease division at the Oregon Health Authority. “Other students are likely to be at much lower risk.”
Two undergraduate students attending Oregon State are being treated this week at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis for meningococcal disease.

One student is being treated for meningococcal disease strain B and is listed by the hospital to be in good condition. Test results for the second student, who also is listed in good condition, were inconclusive. More detailed laboratory analysis for the second student by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be available next week.

“For students under 25 years of age, a meningococcal-B vaccine is available at OSU Student Health Services,” said Jeff Mull, medical director for OSU Student Health Services.

OSU Student Health Services is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. The center is closed Sundays and is located in the Plageman Building, at 108 S.W. Memorial Place

“Oregon State University continues to work closely with our partners in public health at the county and state,” said Steve Clark, vice president of University Relations at Oregon State University. “We continue to undertake every effort possible to inform, help treat, educate, and provide for our students and the public’s health.”

“We continue to emphasize what this disease is; who may be at risk; how a person may recognize symptoms of the disease; what a person should do if they recognize the symptoms; and how our students, faculty, staff and the public can prevent being affected.”

Approximately 160 people have been provided preventive antibiotics since Sunday.

Symptoms of meningococcal disease are high fever, headache, stiff neck, exhaustion, nausea, rash, vomiting and diarrhea. Some people do not get meningitis, but they contract an infection of the bloodstream, which causes fever and a rash. Individuals who have spent at least four hours cumulatively in close, face-to-face association with a person suffering from meningococcal disease within seven days before the illness started are most at risk of catching meningococcal disease.

“It is important to continue to monitor your own health,” said Dr. Bruce Thomson, Benton County health officer.

Anyone experiencing these symptoms should immediately visit their primary care physician or a nearby urgent care medical clinic or emergency room. OSU students experiencing these symptoms should visit OSU Student Health Services.

Meningococcal disease is not highly contagious and is transmitted through direct contact with droplets from an ill person coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or intimate contact.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at 541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/about-shs/health-alerts/meningococcal-update-03-12-17

or
http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

More information will be provided as available.